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Parallel Report
to the Committee on the Rights of the Child on the Combined 5th and 6th Periodic Reports of the Federal Republic of Germany

Realising the Convention’s requirements will require a resolute policy on children’s rights that does not stop at incorporating children’s rights into the Basic Law but also establishes structures that will strengthen the impact of children’s rights in all areas of life.
This report  begins with a discussion of structures and institutions involved in the fulfilment of children’s rights, before turning to concrete examples of implementation – each touching on a general principle of the Convention – drawn from the real-life situations of children.

(PDF, 400 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Other publications

44 Page Count

October 2019

Creative Commons-Lizenz CC-BY-NC-ND

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ABC of Human Rights for Development Cooperation

This electronic information tool introduces the essential features of international human rights protection mechanisms. It is intended to motivate development practitioners to make more use of human rights in development cooperation. The tool is also available in German, Spanish and French. Contains many links.

 

Author: German Institute for Human Rights/ GIZ cross sectoral project "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 505 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

July 2019

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Promising Practice: Strengthening non-discrimination for LGBT in Uganda

Author: GIZ cross sectoral programme "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"/ German Institute for Human Rights

4 pages

(PDF, 596 KB)

Author: GIZ Sektorprogramm "Menschenrechte umsetzen in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit"/ Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

DC Promising Practices

4 Page Count

May 2019

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Sex, gender and sexuality - Human rights issues in development cooperation

This electronic info-tool seeks to motivate development practitioners to consider human rights relating to sexual orientation, gender identity and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) in development cooperation programmes. It provides an overview of relevant human rights obligations and sketches out the situation of LGBTI people worldwide. The tool gives examples of how German development cooperation has dealt with human rights relating to sexual orientation and gender identity so far and concludes with recommendations of how state development cooperation can work on issues related to SOGIESC.

Author: German Institute for Human Rights, GIZ: Cross sectoral programme "Realising human rights including children and youth rights in development cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 389 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

May 2019

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Bringing Human Rights into Fashion
Issues, challenges and underused potentials in the transnational garment industry

The transnational garment industry has the potential to be an engine for socio-economic development in the Asia-Pacific region. It provides ample employment opportunities, particularly for women, enabling – at least in theory – their economic empowerment. However, there is a persistent governance gap in the garment sector, resulting in serious human rights impacts, which chiefly affect women, who make up the majority of garment workers both in the formal and informal sector. This poor human rights record hinders sustainable development. This analysis by the German Institute for Human Rights seeks answers to the question of what contributes to and perpetuates the governance gaps in the global garment sector and what needs to be done to close them.

(PDF, 1,72 MB)

Author: Jan-Christian Niebank

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Study

ISBN: 978-3-946499-40-4 (PDF)
ISBN: 978-3-946499-39-8 (Print)

78 Page Count

January 2019

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Development of the human rights situation in Germany July 2017–June 2018
Executive Summary

The German Institute for Human Rights annually submits a report on the development of the human rights situation in Germany to the German Federal Parliament (in accordance with sec. 2 para. 5 of the Act regarding the Legal Status and Mandate of the German Institute for Human Rights of 16 July 2015; short: DIMRG). The report is presented on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day on 10 December. The DIMRG provides that the German Federal Parliament officially responds to the report. The third report 2017/2018 covers the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

(PDF, 85 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Annual report

12 Page Count

December 2018

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OEIGWG has come in from the cold. Will the EU do the same?
Position paper on the Zero Draft of a binding treaty presented by the Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Companies and Other Business Enterprises

In July, the Open Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises, chaired by Ecuador, published the zero draft of the text of a treaty on business and human rights. This draft is the basis for negotiations in Geneva from 15–19 October 2018. The text represents a good first basis for further negotations among UN member states, and it goes some way toward closing protection gaps, especially in global supply chains. Helpfully, it builds on the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights and focuses on the most urgent areas in this field: the prevention of human rights abuses and access to effective remedy for victims. Rather than elevating corporations to direct subjects of international law, it bolsters the existing architecture of human rights protection: the state duty to protect, enforced by civil and criminal liability. These positive developments compared with earlier documents from the treaty process should be recognized by the UN member states and especially by the European Union. Further rounds of negotiations must now achieve the necessary precision, ironing out of contradicitons, and further development of the text.

(PDF, 180 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Statement

10 Page Count

October 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions and the 2018 UN Climate Conference
Incorporating Human Rights in the Implementation Guidelines of the Paris Agreement

The Paris Agreement of 2015 represents a significant step for the promotion of human rights-based and people-centred climate policies. Critical to this are the implementation guidelines for the Agreement, which are currently being negotiated and are planned to be adopted at COP-24 in December 2018. Given their broad mandate National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) can play a significantly role to ensure that human rights inform the guidelines. The brief provides information about essential elements of the Paris Agreement which the guidelines will address and outlines key aspects the guidelines should include to ensure that climate policies are human-rights based in their design and implementation.

(PDF, 74 KB)

Author: Sébastien Duyck, Nina Eschke, Erika Lennon, Sara Phung

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Information

ISSN: 2509-9493 (PDF)

6 Page Count

August 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions and the 2018 Talanoa Dialogue
Showcasing that Climate Action should be Human Rights-Based

The Talanoa Dialogue on Climate Ambition organised throughout 2018 in the context of the UN climate negotiations offers a significant opportunity for all stakeholders, including National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), to frame climate action in the context of human rights and the principles reaffirmed by the Paris Agreement. The brief provides an overview of the methodology and guiding questions of the Talanoa Dialogue and identifies entry points for NHRIs and other stakeholders to engage in the process. It offers guidance on how information about the importance of integration human rights into climate action can be fed into the Dialogue.

(PDF, 107 KB)

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-59529-7

Author: Sébastien Duyck, Erika Lennon

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Information

ISSN: 2509-9493 (PDF)

4 Page Count

August 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions

Author: German Institute for Human Rights/ GIZ: Cross sectoral project "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 480 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

April 2018

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Die UN-Leitprinzipien als Grundlage für ein verbindliches UN-Abkommen zu Wirtschaft und Menschenrechten

Stellungnahme des Instituts zu den "Entwurfselementen für ein verbindliches Menschenrechtsabkommen" der Offenen Zwischenstaatlichen UN-Arbeitsgruppe zu Transnationalen Konzernen und Sonstigen Unternehmen.

(PDF, 119 KB, nicht barrierefrei)

Publisher: Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

Statement

9 Page Count

March 2018

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Building on the UN Guiding Principles towards a Binding Instrument on Business and Human Rights

Comments on the 'Elements for the Draft Legally Binding Instrument' of the Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises.

(PDF, 410 KB, not barrier free)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Statement

7 Page Count

March 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions in Post-Conflict Situations
Mandates, Experiences and Challenges

How do National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) address the negative human rights impacts of dictatorial regimes and violent conflict, and thus successfully contribute to transitional justice? This is the focus of this study, which presents examples from the experiences of the NHRIs in Afghanistan, Georgia and Uganda. The provision of justice for past and present violations of human rights should reduce impunity. Addressing the issue of transitional justice facilitates peace processes, but requires strong state institutions and the political will to act. When justice for past and present abuses is denied, conflicts linger on. ‘Peace-versus-justice’ is a false dichotomy, and one that the international community has rightly left behind. The study shows how three NHRIs have interacted with transitional justice aims and processes and draws lessons from what the NHRIs have learned while doing so.

(PDF, 893 KB)

Author: Dr. Andrea Breslin, Dr. Anna Würth

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

ISBN: 978-3-945139-96-7 (PDF)

33 Page Count

December 2017

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The Search for Victims of Enforced Disappearance
How the human rights obligation to search can be successfully implemented

The International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance obliges contracting State Parties to search for disappeared persons. An investigation has to be conducted into the location and circumstances of their disappearance and, in the event of their death, their remains identified and returned to their family. In many places, this search proves difficult in practice, and often the political will and/or the technical means for such a search are lacking. In such cases, international urgent actions can support those affected in the search for disappeared persons.

(PDF, 66 KB)

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-55652-7 

Author: Dr. Christiane Schulz

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

ISSN: 25099493 (PDF)

6 Page Count

December 2017

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Development of the human rights situation in Germany July 2016–June 2017
Executive Summary

The German Institute for Human Rights annually submits a report on the development of the human rights situation in Germany to the German Federal Parliament (in accordance with sec. 2 para. 5 of the Act regarding the Legal Status and Mandate of the German Institute for Human Rights of 16 July 2015; short: DIMRG). The report is presented on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day on 10 December. The DIMRG provides that the German Federal Parliament officially responds to the report. The second report 2016 / 2017 covers the period 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017.

(PDF,  119 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Annual report

12 Page Count

December 2017

Free Of Charge not available Download

Promising Practice: Working with civil society to promote LGBT-inclusion in Ukraine

In Ukraine, the legal framework has become more supportive of promoting and protecting the rights of Lesbian, Gay, Bi- and Transsexual and Transgender (LGBT) people in recent years. Nevertheless, homophobia remains widespread and stigmatising social attitudes negatively impact on LGBT people’s access to social and economic rights, such as to health. It is against this background that GIZ has implemented the programme ‘HIV/AIDS advisory services and institutional capacity building’ in cooperation with the Ukrainian Ministry of Health. One component of the programme includes supporting ‘Tergo’, an organisation established and run by parents of LGBT people. The publication describes measures implemented to strengthen Tergo as an organisation and to empower the parents of LGBT people to promote the rights of sexual minorities. It also presents results, remaining challenges and lessons learned.

Author: GIZ cross sectoral programme "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"/ German Institute for Human Rights

5 pages

(PDF, 2.8 MB, not barrier-free)

DC Promising Practices

December 2017

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Analysis: Calculated Risk
Economic versus Human Rights Requirements of Corporate Risk Assessments

Human rights risk assessments help corporations to identify potential adverse effects of their business activities on human rights in order to avoid them, reduce them or compensate those affected. Corporations differ in their understanding of what constitutes a "risk": a corporate risk assessment is about potentially adverse effects on returns on investments or operations. This analysis outlines the different concepts of risk in a human rights and in a business context and illustrates the potential impact this discrepancy can have in practice by using the example of a corporate risk assessment in the Colombian coal sector. From this analysis the Institute derives criteria for possible self-regulatory action on the part of state and business, which can make a human rights risk assessment a mandatory requirement for enterprises.

(PDF, 712 KB)

Author: Deniz Utlu, Jan-Christian Niebank Herausgeber

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

ISBN: 9783946499060 (PDF)
ISBN: 9783946499053 (Print)

30 Page Count

November 2017

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Analysis: Calculated Risk
Economic versus Human Rights Requirements of Corporate Risk Assessments

Human rights risk assessments help corporations to identify potential adverse effects of their business activities on human rights in order to avoid them, reduce them or compensate those affected. Corporations differ in their understanding of what constitutes a "risk": a corporate risk assessment is about potentially adverse effects on returns on investments or operations. This analysis outlines the different concepts of risk in a human rights and in a business context and illustrates the potential impact this discrepancy can have in practice by using the example of a corporate risk assessment in the Colombian coal sector. From this analysis the Institute derives criteria for possible self-regulatory action on the part of state and business, which can make a human rights risk assessment a mandatory requirement for enterprises.

(PDF, 712 KB)

Author: Deniz Utlu, Jan-Christian Niebank Herausgeber

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Study

ISBN: 9783946499060 (PDF)
ISBN: 978-3-946499-21-3 (Print)

30 Page Count

November 2017

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Analysis: Calculated Risk
Economic versus Human Rights Requirements of Corporate Risk Assessments

Human rights risk assessments help corporations to identify potential adverse effects of their business activities on human rights in order to avoid them, reduce them or compensate those affected. Corporations differ in their understanding of what constitutes a "risk": a corporate risk assessment is about potentially adverse effects on returns on investments or operations. This analysis outlines the different concepts of risk in a human rights and in a business context and illustrates the potential impact this discrepancy can have in practice by using the example of a corporate risk assessment in the Colombian coal sector. From this analysis the Institute derives criteria for possible self-regulatory action on the part of state and business, which can make a human rights risk assessment a mandatory requirement for enterprises.

(PDF, 712 KB)

Author: Deniz Utlu, Jan-Christian Niebank Herausgeber

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Study

ISBN: 978-3-946499-18-3 (PDF)
ISBN: 978-3-946499-17-6 (Print)

30 Page Count

November 2017

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