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The situation at the EU external borders and the future European asylum policy
Joint Statement

The latest developments since end of February, when thousands of people arrived at the Greek-Turkish border and tried to reach the EU, provoked a questioning of fundamental international refugee and human rights law and longstanding problems of the Common European Asylum System became even more apparent. According to recent reports, several countries including Germany have submitted different reform proposals suggesting the implementation of mandatory registration and/or asylum procedures at the EU external borders. For this joint statement, the four National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) from Germany, Greece, Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina have intensified their discussions regarding the national developments in their respective countries. The Statement aims to give an idea to what extend the geographical situation plays a crucial role in affecting countries and which conclusions should be drawn from it. Due to their mandates, the Greek, Croatian and Bosnian-Herzegovinian NHRIs are able to provide an insight into the reception conditions, procedures and treatment of asylum seekers on the edge of the European Union.

(PDF, 277 KB, not barrier-free)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights, Greek National Commission for Human Rights, Institution of Human Rights Ombudsman of Bosnia and Herzegovina, The Office of the Ombudswoman, the Republic of Croatia

Statement

11 Page Count

April 2020

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Submission to Inform the Preparation by the CEDAW Committee of a List of Issues Prior to Reporting by Germany

In the following, the GIHR addresses a number of selected fields of implementation that it suggests the CEDAW Committee considers as it prepares the list of issues to be transmitted to Germany prior to the submission of its report.
The proposals concern those thematic areas related to women's human rights in which the GIHR has worked, gathered information and gained expertise during the past years.

(PDF, 227 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Other publications

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-66834-6

11 Page Count

March 2020

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Promising Practice: Strengthening citizen participation and local governance in Benin to leave no one behind

In Benin, considerable progress has been achieved with decentralisation processes in the last 15 years. However, the transfer of resources and competencies from central to local authorities for basic service provision remains limited, so do possibilities for citizen's participation in local decision-making processes, especially marginalised persons and groups, such as women, youth and persons with disabilities. The GIZ Programme ‘Supporting Decentralisation and Municipal Development (PDDC)’ – on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) – supports 25 municipalities in enhancing their ability to provide services and aims to improve effective citizen participation in local governance. This Promising Practice describes the measures implemented by the project, its impact and lessons learned.

Author: German Institute for Human Rights/ GIZ cross sectoral project "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"

4 pages

(PDF, 504 KB)

DC Promising Practices

March 2020

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Comparing National Action Plans implementing the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights
Comparison of European countries and the United States of America

The analysis compares the National Action Plans (NAPs) of several European countries and the United States of America. The NAPs' development process, the conformity of their contents with the
UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UNGPs) and the structures for implementing the plans are compared and, as far as possible, the German efforts to implement the UNGPs are classified and evaluated. The comparison identifies numerous weaknesses, but also examples of successful implementation in the countries examined. A number of general trends can be observed across countries from which lessons learned can be drawn for new and further developments of NAPs.

(PDF, 2 MB)

Author: Jan-Christian Niebank

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Study

36 Page Count

February 2020

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Getting to Critical Mass Will the EU Now Provide the Necessary Traction?
Statement on the Revised Draft for a Legally Binding Human Rights Instrument of the United Nation’s Open-ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises with Respect to Human

With the adoption of Resolution 26/9 in June of 2014, the UN Human Rights Council decided to establish an intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations and other business enterprises (OEIGWG). The working group's mandate is to elaborate an international legally binding instrument to regulate the activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human rights. The OEIGWG met for the fifth round of negotiations from 14 to 18 October 2019. In attendance were 89 of the 193 UN member states, the State of Palestine and the Holy See (as observer states), and also the EU (albeit without a mandate to negotiate). A revised draft1 released by the Ecuadorian chairmanship and dated 16 July 2019 served as the basis for discussion at the session, during which 27 UN member states put forth their views on the draft.

(PDF, 287 KB, nicht barrierefrei)

Publisher: Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

Statement

16 Page Count

December 2019

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Development of the human rights situation in Germany July 2018–June 2019
Executive Summary

The German Institute for Human Rights annually submits a report on the development of the human rights situation in Germany to the German Federal Parliament (in accordance with sec. 2 para. 5 of the Act regarding the Legal Status and Mandate of the German Institute for Human Rights of 16 July 2015; short: DIMRG). The DIMRG provides that the German Federal Parliament officially responds to the report. The fourth report 2018/2019 covers the period 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019.

(PDF, 94 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Annual report

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-66549-8

14 Page Count

December 2019

Creative Commons-Lizenz CC-BY-NC-ND

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Making the implementation of children's rights measurable
Description of the process of developing children's rights indicators for the German context

Thus far, it has been nearly impossible in Germany to make statements about the implementation of human rights obligations that are based on sound statistical data. The United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights recommends the development of human rights indicators: a single right is broken down into specific dimensions, which are then assigned information (that may need to be collected). This text describes a current pilot process being carried out by the National CRC Monitoring Mechanism of the German Institute for Human Rights for the development of children’s rights indicators.

(PDF, 234 KB)

Author: Stephan Gerbig, Claudia Kittel

Publisher: Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

Other publications

12 Page Count

November 2019

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Parallel Report
to the Committee on the Rights of the Child on the Combined 5th and 6th Periodic Reports of the Federal Republic of Germany

Realising the Convention’s requirements will require a resolute policy on children’s rights that does not stop at incorporating children’s rights into the Basic Law but also establishes structures that will strengthen the impact of children’s rights in all areas of life.
This report  begins with a discussion of structures and institutions involved in the fulfilment of children’s rights, before turning to concrete examples of implementation – each touching on a general principle of the Convention – drawn from the real-life situations of children.

(PDF, 400 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Other publications

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-66546-7

44 Page Count

October 2019

Creative Commons-Lizenz CC-BY-NC-ND

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ABC of Human Rights for Development Cooperation

This electronic information tool introduces the essential features of international human rights protection mechanisms. It is intended to motivate development practitioners to make more use of human rights in development cooperation. The tool is also available in German, Spanish and French. Contains many links.

 

Author: German Institute for Human Rights/ GIZ cross sectoral project "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 505 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

July 2019

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Promising Practice: Strengthening non-discrimination for LGBT in Uganda

Author: GIZ cross sectoral programme "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"/ German Institute for Human Rights

4 pages

(PDF, 596 KB)

Author: GIZ Sektorprogramm "Menschenrechte umsetzen in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit"/ Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

DC Promising Practices

4 Page Count

May 2019

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Sex, gender and sexuality - Human rights issues in development cooperation

This electronic info-tool seeks to motivate development practitioners to consider human rights relating to sexual orientation, gender identity and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) in development cooperation programmes. It provides an overview of relevant human rights obligations and sketches out the situation of LGBTI people worldwide. The tool gives examples of how German development cooperation has dealt with human rights relating to sexual orientation and gender identity so far and concludes with recommendations of how state development cooperation can work on issues related to SOGIESC.

Author: German Institute for Human Rights, GIZ: Cross sectoral programme "Realising human rights including children and youth rights in development cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 389 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

May 2019

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Bringing Human Rights into Fashion
Issues, challenges and underused potentials in the transnational garment industry

The transnational garment industry has the potential to be an engine for socio-economic development in the Asia-Pacific region. It provides ample employment opportunities, particularly for women, enabling – at least in theory – their economic empowerment. However, there is a persistent governance gap in the garment sector, resulting in serious human rights impacts, which chiefly affect women, who make up the majority of garment workers both in the formal and informal sector. This poor human rights record hinders sustainable development. This analysis by the German Institute for Human Rights seeks answers to the question of what contributes to and perpetuates the governance gaps in the global garment sector and what needs to be done to close them.

(PDF, 1,72 MB)

Author: Jan-Christian Niebank

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Study

ISBN: 978-3-946499-40-4 (PDF)
ISBN: 978-3-946499-39-8 (Print)

78 Page Count

January 2019

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Development of the human rights situation in Germany July 2017–June 2018
Executive Summary

The German Institute for Human Rights annually submits a report on the development of the human rights situation in Germany to the German Federal Parliament (in accordance with sec. 2 para. 5 of the Act regarding the Legal Status and Mandate of the German Institute for Human Rights of 16 July 2015; short: DIMRG). The report is presented on the occasion of the International Human Rights Day on 10 December. The DIMRG provides that the German Federal Parliament officially responds to the report. The third report 2017/2018 covers the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

(PDF, 85 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Annual report

12 Page Count

December 2018

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OEIGWG has come in from the cold. Will the EU do the same?
Position paper on the Zero Draft of a binding treaty presented by the Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Companies and Other Business Enterprises

In July, the Open Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises, chaired by Ecuador, published the zero draft of the text of a treaty on business and human rights. This draft is the basis for negotiations in Geneva from 15–19 October 2018. The text represents a good first basis for further negotations among UN member states, and it goes some way toward closing protection gaps, especially in global supply chains. Helpfully, it builds on the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights and focuses on the most urgent areas in this field: the prevention of human rights abuses and access to effective remedy for victims. Rather than elevating corporations to direct subjects of international law, it bolsters the existing architecture of human rights protection: the state duty to protect, enforced by civil and criminal liability. These positive developments compared with earlier documents from the treaty process should be recognized by the UN member states and especially by the European Union. Further rounds of negotiations must now achieve the necessary precision, ironing out of contradicitons, and further development of the text.

(PDF, 180 KB)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Statement

10 Page Count

October 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions and the 2018 UN Climate Conference
Incorporating Human Rights in the Implementation Guidelines of the Paris Agreement

The Paris Agreement of 2015 represents a significant step for the promotion of human rights-based and people-centred climate policies. Critical to this are the implementation guidelines for the Agreement, which are currently being negotiated and are planned to be adopted at COP-24 in December 2018. Given their broad mandate National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) can play a significantly role to ensure that human rights inform the guidelines. The brief provides information about essential elements of the Paris Agreement which the guidelines will address and outlines key aspects the guidelines should include to ensure that climate policies are human-rights based in their design and implementation.

(PDF, 74 KB)

Author: Sébastien Duyck, Nina Eschke, Erika Lennon, Sara Phung

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Information

ISSN: 2509-9493 (PDF)

6 Page Count

August 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions and the 2018 Talanoa Dialogue
Showcasing that Climate Action should be Human Rights-Based

The Talanoa Dialogue on Climate Ambition organised throughout 2018 in the context of the UN climate negotiations offers a significant opportunity for all stakeholders, including National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs), to frame climate action in the context of human rights and the principles reaffirmed by the Paris Agreement. The brief provides an overview of the methodology and guiding questions of the Talanoa Dialogue and identifies entry points for NHRIs and other stakeholders to engage in the process. It offers guidance on how information about the importance of integration human rights into climate action can be fed into the Dialogue.

(PDF, 107 KB)

URN: urn:nbn:de:0168-ssoar-59529-7

Author: Sébastien Duyck, Erika Lennon

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Information

ISSN: 2509-9493 (PDF)

4 Page Count

August 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions

Author: German Institute for Human Rights/ GIZ: Cross sectoral project "Realizing Human Rights in Development Cooperation"

10 pages

(PDF, 480 KB)

DC E-Info-Tool

April 2018

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Die UN-Leitprinzipien als Grundlage für ein verbindliches UN-Abkommen zu Wirtschaft und Menschenrechten

Stellungnahme des Instituts zu den "Entwurfselementen für ein verbindliches Menschenrechtsabkommen" der Offenen Zwischenstaatlichen UN-Arbeitsgruppe zu Transnationalen Konzernen und Sonstigen Unternehmen.

(PDF, 119 KB, nicht barrierefrei)

Publisher: Deutsches Institut für Menschenrechte

Statement

9 Page Count

March 2018

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Building on the UN Guiding Principles towards a Binding Instrument on Business and Human Rights

Comments on the 'Elements for the Draft Legally Binding Instrument' of the Open-Ended Intergovernmental Working Group on Transnational Corporations and Other Business Enterprises.

(PDF, 410 KB, not barrier free)

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

Statement

7 Page Count

March 2018

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National Human Rights Institutions in Post-Conflict Situations
Mandates, Experiences and Challenges

How do National Human Rights Institutions (NHRIs) address the negative human rights impacts of dictatorial regimes and violent conflict, and thus successfully contribute to transitional justice? This is the focus of this study, which presents examples from the experiences of the NHRIs in Afghanistan, Georgia and Uganda. The provision of justice for past and present violations of human rights should reduce impunity. Addressing the issue of transitional justice facilitates peace processes, but requires strong state institutions and the political will to act. When justice for past and present abuses is denied, conflicts linger on. ‘Peace-versus-justice’ is a false dichotomy, and one that the international community has rightly left behind. The study shows how three NHRIs have interacted with transitional justice aims and processes and draws lessons from what the NHRIs have learned while doing so.

(PDF, 893 KB)

Author: Dr. Andrea Breslin, Dr. Anna Würth

Publisher: German Institute for Human Rights

ISBN: 978-3-945139-96-7 (PDF)

33 Page Count

December 2017

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