Which Children's Rights are addressed in the CRC?

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Which Children's Rights are addressed in the CRC?

Which Children's Rights are addressed in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child?

Children's rights are addressed in various different international, legally binding human rights conventions, the most important being the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) from the year 1989.

In 54 articles, the CRC lays down the rights of children as well as provisions for their implementation. The rights contained in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child can be divided into three categories: development and provisional rights, protection rights, and participation rights.

Development and provisional rights guarantee children the right to an appropriate quality of life, medical care, social security, and education. By way of their right to a name, registration in a birth register, and a nationality, children are also guaranteed a personal identity and the legal status of a state citizen.

Protection rights ensure children protection from physical and mental violence, neglect, exploitation and abuse. They guarantee children special protection in armed conflict, as refugees or during catastrophes.

Participation rights guarantee children the right to express their opinions freely, and a free, child-oriented access to information and the media. Children have a right to be heard and to have their views taken into due consideration in society. Children’s participation rights ensure freedom of thought, conscience and religion for children, as well as ensuring them privacy. Children also have a right to leisure, and to participation in cultural and artistic life.

All children's rights are:

  • indivisible, meaning that all children’s rights are equally important,
  • interdependent, this means that the restriction of one right usually adversely affects another children’s right. For example, a child who has not been registered in a birth register will usually have difficulties gaining access to education. As such, children’s rights must be considered and implemented in their entirety.


Related links and literature
Convention on the Rights of the Child  (PDF, 112 KB, not barrier free)

Information on the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocols on the Institute's website (German website with English documents)

Stefanie Schmahl (2013): UN Convention on the Rights of the Child with Optional Protocols – Concise Commentary. Baden-Baden, Nomos-Verlagsgesellschaft. (Stefanie Schmahl (2013): Kinderrechtskonvention mit Zusatzprotokollen. Handkommentar. Baden-Baden, Nomos-Verlagsgesellschaft. German only.)


Go to question: Why should children participate?

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